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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
law, not just those indicted by the existing tribunals for rwanda, sierra leone -- >> the house is not order. the speaker pro tempore: the house is not in order. the house is in order. mr. berman: the change is strongly supported by the departments of defense and state. i urge my colleagues to support this important legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentlelady from florida is recognized. ms. ros-lehtinen: i yield such time to the gentleman from california, mr. royce, and the author of the original house-side version of this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i thank the gentlelady. and i do think it's important, as we move forward here, to expand the state department's rewards program. we have found a technique that works and if we can deploy this in order to bring joseph coni or use it to bring to the bar of justice some of the international crime figures that would be turned in under this bill, then it could be very, very beneficia
find customers here in the united states and the money goes back to the women in rwanda to provide for their families. they created a partnership with j. crew, nicole miller, and ralph lauren. >> the newthing about new africa is it creates distribution channels for these women to have access to consumers that would never have access to their products prior. >> you can buy indigo africa's products online, go to nbcwashington.com and search african gifts. >>> let's get one more check on our weather forecast. doug kammerer is live outside the white house now with the national christmas tree lighting. hey, doug. >> reporter: hey, guys. they just brought up neil patrick harris. you see him right there behind me. he's got on a very nice scarf. if you see neil patrick harris, you know things are about to get started here. they're about to bring up the president in the next couple of minutes to light the national christmas tree. we'll be here right on through the rest of the evening. >> celebrating 90 years of a very special national tradition. calvin coolidge has been part of this terrifi
to prevent crimes against humanity happening. after what has happened in rwanda in the 1990's, and in bosnia, the international community came up with an excellent idea after that, in establishing the international criminal court in july of 2002. after that, the responsibility is to protect in 2005. after that, the international community will understand that if a state cannot commit crimes against its own people. should the international community -- the syrian case officially approve that all of this discussion and all of that was untrue. we have been seeing crimes against humanity. we have been seeing war crimes committed by the regime, day-by- day. children, women -- we see all the time torture. children are being tortured. we have been seeing cases of rape in different areas. we have seen a systematic and widespread policy of targeting organization figures and leaders. these are crimes against amenity. despite all of that, we have five special sessions of the u.n. human rights council in geneva. they come up with strong resolutions that what is happening in syria are crimes against huma
on the conflict in the democratic republic of congo. and rwanda's involvement in that country. u.n. security council experts alleged rwanda support of rebels against the congolese army after last month's cease of the city of gomea by a rebel military group. that hearing by house foreign affairs subcommittee will begin live at 3:00 p.m. eastern. you can see it on c-span3. also a look at the republican party in the 113th congress. hear remarks from republican congressman jim jordan and steve scalise on the future of the conservative movement. they'll be speaking 3:30 eastern right here on c-span. >> belittle me. strangle me. >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us i think in this country, we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this if he none none that so many of us -- phenomenon that so many of us experienced one way or another and had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. finally people will starting to stand back and say, hold on. this isn't actually a normal part of g
initially in haiti and rwanda and malawi. they used diesel generators because they had no choice to power the hospital. we told them this is a better way. it will cost more up front with a solar solution, but over time they're actually saving money, lots of money. so it's not just a more sustainable way took economicabeconomica economical economically. it's a smarter way. >> this is about a project in west africa, because it's not just the power and lights. it is a whole revolution in irrigation. take a look. >> thanks to irrigation, the production is multiplied by ten. the crops are more varied and today maize, tomatoes or salad even grow here. >> these women can now feed their families all year-round but also earn money and rise from poverty by selling their crops on the markets. commerce has appeared thanks to solar power, a first step towards development. >> you and i met a few years ago, and you told me about this project. i feel like you should have a budget of a billion dollars. i'm serious. it does seem to me like this is -- we have a -- it's such a crazy conversation about energy
hurdle on the coleco rwanda would lead them to fight even if they lose damascus and as they put additional pressures on the unity of the syrian state and we certainly do not want to see the syrian state disintegrate. it goes back into this question of how to convince the community that it has a role in the future of syria like others in their doesn't have to be a genocide. i was struck by the editorial or an opinion piece in "the new york times" i think at the beginning of last week for the week before about the next genocide being against allowites, and that fear is present among the community members and so what you are talking about is just an extension of that and the way around it is the political solution the longer the violence goes on, the more extremist groups benefit and based on what we have seen of no sort of parent organization, al qaeda and iraqi will not be merciful at all so it is incumbent on us to bolster what in the political opposition which is what we are trying to do. >> thank you, ambassador woo-hoo when you say the regime is numbered is that proverbial or
weapon ban, so-called. every gun is an assault weapon. the machetes in uganda, or i'm sorry, rwanda, the worst genocide that we know of in human history. 800,000 or so, with a ma -- with machetes. of course we know during world war ii, the genocide wasn't just 800,000, it was millions. six million jews, killed by all kinds of means. so we need to be smart about the way we deal with this issue of mass murders and violence in our society. everything should be on the table. and as we continue to remember the loved ones of those who were victims of the tragedy at newtown, connecticut, things go on here in this town. this body, we've been alerted tomorrow, will vote on what's being called plan b. plan a was to try to reach an agreement with the president. but from my experience as an attorney, i've negotiated small deals, multimillion dollar deals, i have certified -- i was district judge, chief justice, certified mediator, i don't know if there's anybody else in the congressional body that's been through the training and process of becoming an international arbitrator. and a lot of expe
statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranked no. 1. if you look around the markets, you will see the authority. 90% of the world's population. they're going to see improvements in those lives. there will be issues, but the story is very strong and that is why we are seeing the story being very positive. >> tell us about the frontier markets because you cite the story of capital labor productivity. it will explode very dramatically? >> i think there is a clear delineation between the advanced emerging economies and the frontier economies, but our related or integrated it is to the developed market, how much exposure do they have? in terms of trade and foreign direct investment, it is heavily dependent on the united states and europe. africa has 1 billion people and is less than 2% of world trade or direct investment. the real engine of growth is not going to be trade, unfortunately. if you look at valuations of the bank's and trading in the local market, the story is credible and hits to the story rather than be
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)